nutrition

Like any sport, nutrition plays an important role in cycling. Whether you’re a pro, a casual racer, or just a weekend joy rider, what you eat plays a vital role in your performance. Proper nutrition enables a cyclist to avoid cramping, dehydration, energy loss, and a bad attitude.

“Carbo-O-Loading” is an extremely common phrase used in the biking world. Glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose that works as energy storage in humans. In the body, a very limit space is allotted to the storage of glycogen, around 1% or 2%. This small amount can produce upwards of 85% of the body’s total energy production, making it a crucial commodity to a human, especially an athlete. Since the storage space is so small, a person exercising almost around the clock would have a very hard time replenishing their glycogen level. Therefor, “Carb-O-Loading” is a cyclist’s best friend.

This process should begin two days before a scheduled race. Each day, a rider should consume around 10 grams of carbohydrates per kilogram of their body weight (for example, a 150 pound rider would need to eat the amount of carbohydrates found in 26 bananas a day.) When your body runs out of glycogen, that’s when a rider hits a wall, the legs can’t pedal anymore.

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http://www.lavelocita.cc/nutrition-page/using-carbohydrates-to-fuel-endurance-sport

 

On top of carbs, a rider needs lean protein to help the body rebuild muscles. Without the proper intake of protein, an athlete’s body takes from the muscle mass. Cyclists are recommended to consume about 0.5 grams of protein per pound of body mass (for example, a 150 pound rider should eat a little more than 2 chicken breasts a day). Protein is a slow-digesting nutrient. This ensures that the energy consumed is spread out over a period of time for the body to use, unlike the fast-spent carbohydrates.

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http://www.pezcyclingnews.com/latestnews/toolbox-on-the-road-cuisine-2/

 

 

http://www.bicycling.com/food/power-protein

https://www.musclesound.com/what-is-glycogen/

https://cyclingtips.com/2009/05/how-to-carb-load/

https://www.duvine.com/10-nutrition-tips-for-cyclists/

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road bodies

After observing a few mountain and a few road races, it becomes extremely easy to tell the difference between a roadie and a MTB rider simply by looking at their bodies. Where a mountain rider is built in the thighs and upper body, a road rider is uniquely trim and slim. With noodle arms and paper-thin abdomen, these racers will be light and cut through the wind much easier. The calves of road riders will be particularly evident, however.

Another way to recognize a road rider is the “bikers tan”. This distinct tan is so prominent it creates the illusion that a rider still has their race uniform on whenever they are naked.

tan-lines1.jpghttp://www.womenscycling.ca/blog/health-tips/cycling-tan-lines-love-them-or-hate-them/

Road training is extremely different from mountain. This form of cycling focuses on endurance more than technicality. Daily, a rider will train anywhere between 40 and 100+ miles at speeds twice as fast as mountain. It is quite possible to receive a traffic violation for speeding on these carbon stallions, I would know.

imgres.jpghttps://cyclingtips.com/2009/07/bizzaro-world/

As it is dangerous to train in a place where cars are speeding past, proper attire should be worn. Bright colors and a flashing light should be on the rider’s person to assure drivers see them. Back roads are preferable to highways. Steep climbs, speedy flats, and deadly downhills make road biking the fun activity it is.

whats in the bike

At a cycling event, hearing the words “carbon fiber” makes an image of dollar signs flash into the mind. A pretty penny can be spent on a mountain bike. A rider will typically have at least two machines, one for training and the other for racing. A decent race bike can range anywhere between $3,000 and $15,000+.

Mountain bike racing requires a light (carbon fiber most likely), stiff rig around 23-28 pounds. Most of these (depending on which category you race) will have suspension in the front fork but no suspension in the back. These are called “hard tails”. Training bikes will typically be heavier to build muscles. It is also acceptable to have shock absorbers on both ends; this would be classified as a “full suspension” bike. A full suspension bike is like riding in a new Cadillac. Climbing through a rock garden with a FS is much kinder to your back, and your backside, than a hard tail would be.

 

SES-Dunkeld.jpgSES Dunkeld – Copyright Ian Linton. Last outing for the Radon Slide 160

A road bike will be the lightest of bikes, the frame made entirely of carbon fiber. The minimum weight to meet UCI standards is 15 pounds for a road bike. However, road bikes are being manufactured at as little as 12 pounds. Roadies will have zero suspension. This stiffness enables all power exerted from the legs to go straight to the crank and move the wheel.

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http://yellowjerseycycle.com/portfolio-item/cervelo-s3-road-bike-build/

 

A decent carbon road bike can range $3,000 all the way to $20,000+. The frame of the bike is commonly speculated as the most expensive aspect of the bike, however, often times the money is actually in the wheels. Having a machine entirely made of carbon is risky business. While carbon fiber is light and thin, it is also extremely prone to cracking and shattering. One wreck can destroy a frame, and the rider’s bank account.

 

http://bicyclesportshop.com/buyers-guides/buying-a-new-road-bike-heres-all-you-need-to-know-pg83.htm

http://enduro-mtb.com/en/aiming-high-part-7-james-shirley-bikes-vans-girls/

http://guides.wiggle.co.uk/mountain-bike-buying-guide

An Intro to Cycling

Nearly everyone is partial to one sport or another, whether it’s watching the events or competing. Basketball, baseball, soccer, and a few others come to mind when thinking of common athletics. Cycling, a vigorous and highly competitive sport is often forgotten, as it is a more rare sport. For perspective, the NFHS reported 7.8 million high school athletes alone in 2013, where the USA Cycling organization only reported 74,516 members within 38 different age groups, not just high school .

Within the organization, there are a few categories. The main cycling cats are road biking and mountain biking . While both are extremely arduous and taxing, road and mountain biking are unique from each other in many ways. To confine either to simply “road” or “mountain” would be incorrect due to the many subcategories. Within “road biking” lies criterium, track, tri, endurance, and time trial. “Mountain biking” contains downhill super D, slalom, enduro, cyclocross, and cross country. Bike cost, riders’ body type, trail/path terrain, gear, and training are all just a few components that separate one type of cycling from another. Inside_1_G16_TeamCamp_3868.jpg

http://www.pinkbike.com/news/photo-epic-dvo-nevada-state-dh-championships-at-bootleg-canyon-2017.html

NORBA (National Off Road Bicycle Association) is the branch of USA Cycling that deals with mountain biking. Mountain biking is an extremely technical sport. The technicality of it means a full body workout. Rock hopping on boulders or over a log while averaging around 15 mph requires major upper body strength. Hitting a large root at that speed can throw a rider off the bike and cause serious injury to them, and the precious baby of carbon under their feet. A serious rider will have shoes equipped with cleats that attach to the pedals, creating a “one with the bike” sensation. A Mountain biker will have mega thighs, calves, triceps, and core. A typical rider is more “hefty” and could go as far as resemble a pear in shape.

USCF (united States Cycling Federation) is a branch of USA Cycling that deals with the Road aspect of the sport. Where mountain biking is focused more on building the muscles of the body, road riding involves a whole lot of cardio. Long, long distances go into roadie training. For this, a rider only needs one bike. A road bike will be the lightest of bikes, the frame made entirely of carbon fiber. Where a mountain rider is built in the thighs and upper body, a road rider is uniquely trim and slim. With noodle arms and paper-thin abdomen, these racers will be light and cut through the wind much easier. The calves of road riders will be particularly evident, however. Another way to recognize a road rider is the “bikers tan”. This distinct tan is so prominent it creates the illusion that a rider still has their race uniform on whenever they are naked.

http://www.nfhs.org/ParticipationStatics/ParticipationStatics.aspx/

https://www.usacycling.org/

Who is Jess Tillson?

As my site title shows, my name is Jess Tillson. I am a full-time student here at Murray State University and I am enrolled in several courses, including news writing. For the class, we a required to create and maintain a blog for the semester. My blog will begin with a introduction to myself and my interests. I am from Marshall County, Kentucky, and graduated from Paducah Tilghman high School in February of 2016. Prior to attending Tilghman, I went to Marshall County for two and a half years.